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Ten States Increasing Minimum Wage in 2013

December 27, 2012
By Scott J. Wenner

Multi-state employers must be attentive to increases in state minimum wages that tend to occur annually, as some states have laws that require annual increases based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and inflation.  All but one of the minimum wage increases that will take effect on January 1, 2013 are automatic – i.e., prompted by the CPI. Here are the states with minimum wage changes, including changes to the minimum wage for tipped workers (the definition of “tipped employee” differs somewhat from state to state but generally refers to certain restaurant and other hospitality workers):

Arizona – Minimum wage will increase from $7.65 to $7.80 per hour. Tipped employee minimum increases from $4.65 to $4.80.

Colorado – Minimum wage will increase from $7.64 to $7.78 per hour. Tipped employee hourly minimum increases from $4.62 to $4.76

Florida – Minimum wage will increase from $7.67 to $7.79 per hour.  Tipped employee minimum hourly wage increases from $4.65 to $4.77 an hour.

Missouri – Standard minimum wage increases from $7.25 to $7.35 an hour. Minimum wage for tipped employees increases from $3.63 to $3.68.

Montana – Standard minimum wage increases from $7.65 to $7.80 an hour. No tip credit is permitted by state law.

Ohio – Minimum wage will increase from $7.70 to $7.85 per hour.   Tipped employee minimum hourly wage increases from $3.85 to $3.93.

Oregon – Minimum wage increases from $8.80 to $8.95 per hour. No tip credit is permitted by state law.

Rhode Island – Minimum wage will increases from $7.40 to $7.75 per hour under special legislation enacted in 2012 unrelated to the CPI.  Tipped employee hourly minimum of $2.89 per hour is unchanged.

Vermont – Minimum wage will increases from $8.46 to $8.60 per hour.  Tipped employee hourly minimum wage increases from $4.10 to $4.17.

Washington – Minimum wage will increase from $9.04 to $9.19 per hour. No tip credit is permitted by state law.

For more information regarding this or other labor and employment issues, please contact Scott J. Wenner,  chair of the Schnader’s Labor and Employment Practices Group. 
The materials posted on Schnader.com and SchnaderWorks.com are prepared for informational purposes only and should not be considered as providing legal advice or creating an attorney-client relationship. Please see our disclaimer page for a full explanation.
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